Article Info

published: 9/6/13

Related Books


Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church

Cross & Livingstone


Mere Christianity

C.S. Lewis


Introduction to Christianity

Joseph Ratzinger (Pope Benedict XVI)


Christian Theology

Alister McGrath


Christian Beliefs

Wayne Grudem


Catechism of the Catholic Church

U.S. Catholic Church


A Summary of Christian History

Robert Andrew Baker


Jesus Among Other Gods

Ravi Zacharias

The World Evangelical Alliance



What is the World Evangelical Alliance?

The World Evangelical Alliance (WEA) is a global ministry working with local churches around the world to join in common concern to live and proclaim the "Good News of Jesus" in their communities. W

EA is a network of churches in 128 nations that have each formed an Evangelical alliance and over 100 international organizations joining together to give a worldwide identity, voice and platform to more than 600 million evangelical Christians. Seeking holiness, justice and renewal at every level of society - individual, family, community and culture - its aim is uniting to transform the nations so that God is glorified.

Christians from ten countries met in London in 1846 for the purpose of launching, in their own words, "a new thing in church history, a definite organization for the expression of unity amongst Christian individuals belonging to different churches." This was the beginning of a vision that was fulfilled in 1951 when believers from 21 countries officially formed the World Evangelical Fellowship.





Today, 150 years after the London gathering, WEA is a dynamic global structure for unity and action that embraces 600 million evangelicals in 128 countries. It is a unity based on the historic Christian faith expressed in the evangelical tradition. And it looks to the future with vision to accomplish God's purposes in discipling the nations for Jesus Christ.

Today, WEA seeks to strengthen local churches through national alliances, supporting and coordinating grassroots leadership and seeking practical ways of showing the unity of the body of Christ.




Source

"The World Evangelical Alliance" Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (with minor edits), under GFDL.